Black Women and Asian Men: K-POP @ KCON With G-Dragon And Missy Elliot Makes History

Oh, that was a mouthful.

So, for some of you this may be old news, but I like this story….

On August 24 – 24, an event called KCON took place in Los Angeles at LA Memorial Sports Arena. This venue accommodated a doubling of attendance from last year to around 20k.

G-Dragon performed his new single Nilira with Missy Elliott. The history-making aspect being she’s the first and only, so far, non-Asian to perform at this KCON. Although she’s not the first black woman artist to do a song with a K-Pop star. Lil Kim did one with Se7en. I think Amerie did one with him as well. There may be others.

See how black women roll?

From what I’ve read, G-Dragon and Missy Elliott are mutual fans. He asked her to collaborate with him. What makes it work is that they have a similar style. They mesh very nicely – in sync, in rhythm and flow.



Here’s one of his videos. Most amusing. has more.


Some Nights by Fun and Too Close by Alex Clare

I’ve been hearing “Some Nights” on the radio, not knowing who made it. You know how DJs cannot be bothered to announce who created something. So, I thought it was a classic song by Ladysmith Black Mambazo  (a group from way back when).

Well, this video changed my perception of the song, because it initially made me think of the Lion King.

Beautifully done…



Too Close

Is it me, or does Alex Clare have an Adele vibe to his singing? She sits in a chair in one video too. I first heard this song for an online ad for Internet Explorer, but it was more of a techno remix version.


Black Women and Asian Men: K-Pop Video with Jay Park Makes History

Sorta continuing the BW / AM theme

The following link is an article from Mauika Hicks makes K-Pop history by being the love interest and lead dancer for Jay Park (he’s American of Korean descent).

Some excerpts – the rest you’ll have to read at their site. It’s quite an informative interview.

Paulette: How does it feel to be the first African-American female lead dancer and love interest in a Kpop (Korean pop) music video (MV)?

Mauika Hicks: It’s such an honor and blessing. I’ve received so many positive messages from young African-American girls and people from all races telling me how much I have inspired them. To inspire people is all I could ever ask for. I feel so proud to be a part of history in a sense.

Paulette: When you got the part, were you aware that you broke the glass ceiling for a black woman to be in a Kpop MV?

MH: Not really. It came as quite a shock.

And this …

Paulette: Jay Park is a pretty big star. He was the lead singer in 2PM, opened for Ne-Yo, performed with MusiqSoulChild, just finished his first sold-out U.S. tour, appeared in a couple of films and the list goes on. Were you familiar with his work before being cast in the MV?

MH: I didn’t know Jay before the video. Once I booked the job, I did a little research online and realized just how big of a star he is!

Paulette: You and Jay have this amazing, off the chain chemistry in the MV. How was it working with Jay?

MH: Thank you! It was very easy working with Jay. He was very down to earth and hands-on in every aspect of the video. Sometimes it can be a challenge working with artists, but not with Jay. He was very professional and just amazing to work with!

Mauika Hicks appears at the 2:07 mark.


He’s Famous And Fearlessly Included a BW

You know how it goes in the US, when someone wants to eventually become famous – they put a couple of black faces in their videos or music. When that success has been achieved, we’re the first faces gone. Everything fades to white.

I wanted to highlight something about Jay Park: he’s already a big star. Yet, he didn’t shy away from bringing a BW into his music video – even in Korea (a country not known for embracing or being a multicultural society, obviously). He didn’t use any “scare away the fans” excuse for excluding a BW, unlike some of the hypocrites and phonies over here would.

Good on him.

Remember, Hollywood and the American Media loves to claim that our black faces will make people – around the entire world! – avoid their crappola media content if we’re front and center.

Call bull dung on it. It is their bigotry at work, not the international folks. And people will always criticize the content – that’s a given.

Last Note: How White Women Roll

We have a famous actor – from Europe – being stalked by crazy white supremacist women (along with those horseface online and print magazine editors). He dares to publicly be in a relationship with a black woman, while he is incredibly hot and rich. It is not happening before he’s famous, and he’s not hiding her like a dirty secret either.

And I bet it will not affect his career one whit.

He’s being criticized by these same Neo-Nazi bitches who will chime in “love is colorblind” on every IR forum, but only if the chick is a white woman. Otherwise, they will wonder what’s wrong with the guy, denigrate the black woman’s looks and basically go bonkers. Because every man must find them attractive, or the world is off-kilter.

Always remember these are the same people who run the media. That’s why you rarely see uplifting images of black women in a positive, attractive and alluring manner, because these people want it that way.


Links relating to this topic are welcome.


One Asian World Interview – First Black Woman as Love Interest



For Black Women: R.I.P. Whitney Houston

I did not know her personally. Yet, there’s so much hear-say that black folks like to pass along – gossipy nonsense – just so they could pretend they knew her. You know, a friend of a friend of a friend. I live in New Jersey. So, I’ve heard my share of crap.

Back in the day, pre-innernets, Bossip and TMZ, et al, I couldn’t read a black magazine or go to a hair salon without people talking about Ms Whitney. It was the same for Eddie Murphy, and a few other fresh faces of black super-stardom. That’s because there are neighborhoods in NJ where some wealthy (famous and non-famous) blacks clustered. I can recall people who saw her in person – shopping at a local store – and they spoke about not only how beautiful she was, but nice and graceous.

I grabbed this image from:

Acting Black / Acting White Dogma

The criticisms of her back when she was a rising star, collectively uttered from the Black Thought Police, had very little to do with her supposed attraction to roughneck DBR (damaged beyond repair) black males. It was actually the opposite: she was criticized for being extremely tight with her own crew of close-knit female friends, and being very accommodating – polite and very willing to mingle – with white people. Folks were also up-in-arms, because her music writers were white. I kid you not.

Black critics complained about Ms Whitney like they were frightened of her becoming – I dunno – white or something? The accusations were so bizarre and idiotic. I think they just hated the fact that she was classy, well spoken, and kept to her own little group. Yet, isn’t this the weird stigma that blacks who do well in school have to face? Being smart and well spoken is being white?

I recently had some chicks at my job ask me why I’m always well dressed. Digest the stupidity of that for a moment. You don’t need to ask if they’re black. 🙂

Think of it this way: wasn’t the fear of her “escaping” somewhat similar to the grief black women get for thinking for themselves? You know, dating IR, leaving the neighborhood, getting a better job, finishing school, and living to the best of your ability? Do you think it’s an accident Tina Turner left the country? Or how Diana Ross ran from black folks? Isn’t Halle Berry running away too? These women have self-preservation utmost in their minds. They know that kowtowing to the Black Thought Police is detrimental.

The Hood Chick Fiction

I’ll be honest. I hate reading about people trying to make Ms Whitney into a rough neck girl or a hood-rat that hid it well from the public, because she grew up near or in Newark, NJ. Come on, now.

You ever watch Whitney during her early days when she was being interviewed by the mainstream media nationally and internationally? You cannot fake that kind of class. You cannot fake speaking that well unless you went to a good school and learned how. You ever watch some our illiterate, uneducated and gangsta wannabe athletes struggle to utter a coherent sentence? So, why are people trying to put Whitney down there with them? Come on, now.

How could she be hood, when her mother is Sissy Houston, a well-known R&B singer, a famous cousin that is Dionne Warwick, and a father that was in the music business long before she was born? Come on, now.

And don’t we always say we speak differently depending on the environment? There’s relaxed “I’m among friends” speech, and then there’s formal speech. Listen to Whitney sing: she could enunciate like nobody’s business. Try listening to Mary J. Blige and some of these girls who really are hood. Good luck figuring out what they are singing about. (And I like Mary J., so don’t get me wrong.)

Even if she was from a tough neighborhood, that doesn’t mean she wasn’t a sensitive, delicate, vulnerable and emotional woman. That’s the part that bothers me the most when people are dismissive of black girls or women who come from rough neighborhoods. They have feelings too. Just because they are better at masking it doesn’t mean they still don’t hurt. You think it’s easy to be dogged on a daily basis? That’s emotionally damaging, folks.

Anyone coming out of that environment untroubled is miraculous and highly improbable. The damage lingers for years, the scars cannot be seen, because they are the emotional kind.

An American Icon

She was one of the last true divas whose music I purchased. I cannot think of anyone who can hold a candle to that voice.

“I’ll Always Love You,” makes me cry every time I heard it.

You think any of these synthetic, Auto-Tune, overly-dramatic, yipping like a dog struck by a car, too cute to be for real, computer assisted chicks really know how to sing? Come on, now.

She blew the roof off with her rendition of the National Anthem. Now, look at how many twits cannot even remember the lyrics to give a decent performance singing it. They have no shame. They have no class. They show up for themselves. They aren’t there for the fans who made them rich. I cannot stand most of them.

What I loved about Whitney Houston and Michael Jackson is that they were old school in their professionalism. They showed up and gave 110% of themselves to their fans. I’ll give Madonna and Prince the same props – they’re performers who give it their all.

The music business keeps wondering why the sales of their music declines every year. It’s because they’re running out of real talent, here in the USA, that appeals to everyone. And passing restrictive Internet laws isn’t going to recoup those losses either.

I’ll miss you Ms Whitney Houston, because I was rooting for you to come back and blow everyone away again.


Kevin Costner Stays Mum About Their Relationship
He Will Speak at Her Funeral


Lessons In Synchronicity & Love: Kevin Costner On Whitney Houston – A fantastic post from Faith’s Blog. Check it out.

Had no idea they were friends....



Hey Ya Song – 2 Versions

I like this a little more. Sung by Obadiah Parker. It’s a slowed down earthy version, sounds a bit country.


Here’s the original by OutKast. Andre’s not afraid of being flamboyant, is he?

And where can I find someone to do my hair as nice as his? 😀


Korean Hip Hop / K-Pop: T.O.P – Turn It Up

Gorgeous young man. Makes me think of a young Vulcan, in a Spock-like kinda way. Sexy.

Everyone seems to move like Michael Jackson (R.I.P.) to me.

I wonder when the fusion of Korean and black American music occurred? That’s rather fascinating to me.